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Trailer Q&A:

Everything you need to know before you buy or rent a trailer.

What are the different types of trailers?

Drop Deck Trailers – A drop deck trailer is a commercial trailer designed to carry tall cargo that exceeds the legal height limit if transported on a traditional flatbed trailer. Transporting tall cargo on a drop deck trailer prevents drivers and operators from having to obtain permits.

Gooseneck Trailers – Gooseneck trailers can be much longer, wider, and heavier than most bumper-pull units, which allows them to carry more weight (upward of 30,000 pounds) without compromising stability. They're typically used for commercial purposes such as hot-shot vehicle towing, agriculture, horse/livestock transporting, etc.

Deck Over Trailers – A deck over trailers, however, have a deck that rests above the wheels, creating a wider platform and a higher center of gravity. The deck over setup also allows for more versatility in cargo and towing styles, but not everyone prefers this style.

Aluminum Trailers – Lightweight: One of the strongest advantages aluminum trailers have is their lightweight construction. This makes them much easier to haul for lighter vehicles and helps keep those vehicles more fuel-efficient.

Dump Trailers – A dump trailer is a perfect option for taking on a landscaping project. If you’re a landscaper, this workhorse will take on the back-breaking process of moving mulch, topsoil, and other materials.

How do I choose a trailer?

First, think about the following questions:

  • How will it be used?
  • What size do I need?
  • What load capacity do I need?
  • Is the bed height a factor?
  • Does it need sides?
  • Do I need ramps?
  • What about a tailgate?
  • What will I use to tow the trailer?

Should I buy or rent a trailer?

To purchase a trailer, you'll either need a sizeable amount of cash or decent credit. While a purchase requires a larger upfront cost, it could save you money over time, especially if you plan on using the machine frequently. Use this general rule of thumb: if you use the machine more than 65% of the year, a purchase makes sense. If you use it less than 65% (or less than eight months in a year), then you should rent. There are also possible tax advantages of buying as well as the potential return on investment, ask your accountant what makes sense for you.

Trailer Type Glossary

Aluminum Trailer - Not only did aluminum resist rust and corrosion, but it was also lighter and therefore easier to pull. Trailer owners reporting better gas mileage when hauling an aluminum trailer only added to its popularity. All-aluminum trailers tend to be more expensive than steel trailers, however.

Deck-Over Tag Trailer - Also know as a Semi trailer, is a trailer that does not impose a load on the front axle or axle group of the towing vehicle. These are designed to haul extra equipment such as a backhoe or excavator behind another vehicle like a dump truck or semi truck.

Deck-Over Trailer - these have a deck that sits above the trailer wheels. This makes the platform higher and wider than the traditional flat deck option, giving you more ground clearance and loading space. You typically see fewer of this type of trailer on the road today, but they are becoming increasingly common. A deckover-style trailer eliminates the problem for forklifts because the upper deck is flat and level across the trailer platform.

Drop-Deck Trailer - is a commercial trailer designed to carry tall cargo that exceeds the legal height limit if transported on a traditional flatbed trailer. Transporting tall cargo on a step deck prevents drivers and operators from having to obtain permits. You can haul items such as excavators, tractors, building materials and more!

Dump Trailer - is a trailer with four walls and no top that tilts upward enabling you do "dump" your matierials. These are constructed with the versatility to haul anything from sand and aggregate to scrap and building materials

Gooseneck Trailer - A gooseneck trailer's defining characteristic is a long, curved neck where other trailers might have a simple hitch. It affixes to the bed of a pickup truck or similar vehicle, which is the only real drawback—unless you own or can easily access a tow vehicle like that, the gooseneck hitch isn't worth much. They can be much longer, wider, and heavier than most bumper-pull units, which allows them to carry more weight (upward of 30,000 pounds) without compromising stability. They're typically used for commercial purposes such as hot-shot vehicle towing, agriculture, horse/livestock transporting, etc.

Tilt Trailer - As the name implies, a tilt trailer is a type of adjustable trailer that tilts back and down to aid in loading. These are designed to make quick work of loading and unloading cargo and powered equipment. Hydraulic cylinders ensure smooth and steady tilt rates, while smart deck designs reduce load angle.

Utility Trailer - is an unpowered vehicle pulled or towed by a powered vehicle such as a car or truck. The trailer has wheels and can be built as a flat-bed open-air trailer or as an enclosed trailer with shelving units or specialty equipment built in. A utility trailer can be used to transport goods and cargo ranging from power equipment and camping supplies to antiques and furniture. This means that you can use your rig to carry bulky materials at your worksite and even haul your belongings from one place to another.

Lano Equipment Shakopee

3021 133rd St W, Shakopee, MN 55379, USA

Lano Equipment Loretto

23580 Hwy 55, Loretto, MN 55357, USA

Lano Equipment Anoka

6140 US-10, Ramsey, MN 55303, USA